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Report Number Cb19-SFS.122
Component ID: #ti517572978

From the Newsroom, June 20, 2019, Release Number CB19-90:

Population Estimates Show Aging Across Race Groups Differs

As the nation continues to grow older, it is also changing by race and ethnicity. View our graphic on the age and race distribution from 2010 to 2018 to see how the nation has grown more diverse. References below to the race and ethnicity compositions are for race-alone-or-in-combination groups or Hispanic (any race) unless otherwise specified.

  • Of the 50 states and the District of Columbia, 20 had a white population of 5.0 million or more, 21 were between 1.0 million and 4.9 million, nine were between 500,000 and 999,999, and one, the District of Columbia, had a population between 100,000 and 499,999.
  • In 2018, 18 states had a black population greater than or equal to 1.0 million.
  • California was the only state to have an Asian population larger than 5 million, at 6,890,703 in 2018. New York (1,922,974) and Texas (1,688,966) were the only two states that had a population between 1.0 million and 4.9 million.
  • The American Indian and Alaska Native population was over 1.0 million in only one state, California, at 1,089,694 in 2018.
  • In 2018, 36 states and the District of Columbia had a Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander population that was less than 20,000. The two states with the largest Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander populations in 2018 were Hawaii (382,261) and California (363,437).
  • In 2018, the Hispanic population was between 100,000 and 499,999 in 20 states. Among the states and the District of Columbia, 10 states had a Hispanic population of 1.0 million or more. California (15,540,142), Texas (11,368,849), and Florida (5,562,417) were the only states that had populations of 5.0 million or more.

Component ID: #ti974434819

Key Stats:

Source: Vintage 2018 Population Estimates.

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More Stats:

Source: 2010-2018 Population Estimates and 2010 Census.

Component ID: #ti2130316387


Source: 2017 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates. 

Component ID: #ti209300280


Sources: 2010 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates; 2010 Census; and 1940 Census. The 1940 Census came at a momentous time in our nation’s history — as we recovered from the Great Depression and not long before our entry into World War II. It was also the first census that looked deeper into the details of much of American life.

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