Skip Header

We are hiring thousands of people for the 2020 Census. Click to learn more and apply.

Table and Figures

Component ID: #ti1154820386

Sound Bites (Downloadable)

What information was released?

Available for Download:

Component ID: #ti786724368

Attribute to: Stella U. Ogunwole, statistician/demographer, Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau

We released a report on the population indicating Ethiopian, Nigerian, Haitian, Jamaican, and Trinidadian and Tobagonian ancestry in the United States. The report is based on data from the 2008 to 2012 American Community Survey, 5-year estimates. It presents and compares selected geographic, demographic, and socioeconomic characteristics of these groups.

Why was it important to look at these ancestry groups?

Available for Download:

Component ID: #ti1697490288

Attribute to: Stella U. Ogunwole, statistician/demographer, Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau

These are ancestry groups that have been little-researched in the past, so we wanted to use quality data such as the American Community Survey to document this growing diversity of ethnic groups that have come to the United States.  This information can also be used in making informed decisions by the groups themselves as well as policy makers, local businesses and planners.

In what states and metropolitan statistical areas do they live?

Component ID: #ti893681321

Attribute to: Darryl T. Cohen, geographer, Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau

The populations with Haitian, Jamaican, and Trinidadian and Tobagonian ancestries were most concentrated in Florida and New York. The largest percentage of Ethiopian ancestry population lived in California while Texas had the largest percentage of Nigerian ancestry population. Within the metro areas, Miami had the largest population with Haitian ancestry.

The New York metro area had the largest concentrations of Nigerian, Jamaican, and Trinidadian and Tobagonians ancestry populations, while the largest population of Ethiopian ancestry was in the Washington metro area.

What significant demographic patterns do you see?

Available for Download:

Component ID: #ti1048454250

Attribute to: Stella U. Ogunwole, statistician/demographer, Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau

One notable demographic pattern is the younger age structure of the selected ancestry groups compared to the overall U.S. population. The median age of the U.S. population was 37 years compared with a range of about 30 years for Ethiopian, Nigerian, and Haitian ancestry groups to 36 years for those reporting Trinidadian and Tobagonian ancestry. This younger age structure is reflected in the relatively higher labor force participation rates of these groups.

What significant socioeconomic patterns do you see?

Available for Download:

Component ID: #ti2105865874

Attribute to: Stella U. Ogunwole, statistician/demographer, Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau

One of the most interesting findings is that 61 percent of the population reporting Nigerian ancestry 25 years and older, had a bachelor's degree or higher. That's more than twice the U.S. rate of 28.5 percent, and the highest among the selected ancestry groups. 

Component ID: #ti39711952

Public Information Office Contacts

X
  Is this page helpful?
Thumbs Up Image Yes    Thumbs Down Image No
X
Comments or suggestions?
No, thanks
255 characters remaining
X
Thank you for your feedback.
Comments or suggestions?
Back to Header