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Report Number P60-08
Component ID: #ti5809185

About 7 million of the Nation's children lived in families with annual incomes of $5,000 or more in 1949, according to estimates based on the Current Population Survey, issued today by Roy V. Peel, Director, Bureau of the Census, Department of Commerce. In contrast, about 11 million children were in families with incomes under $2,000. The distribution of American children under 18 years old according to the amount of family income is shown below:1

Table 1.--FAMILIES, AND CHILDREN UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE, BY FAMILY INCOME, FOR THE UNITED STATES: 1949

Family Income Number of Families Number of Children
Total 39,193,000 42,253,000
Under $1,000 4,748,000 4,524,000
$1,000 to $1,999 5,848,000 6,414,000
$2,000 to $2,999 8,100,000 9,405,000
$3,000 to $3,999 7,819,000 9,781,000
$4,000 to $4,999 4,722,000 5,075,000
$5,000 to $5,999 3,078,000 3,004,000
$6,000 and over 4,879,000 4,051,000

One-fourth of the children in the United States lived in families with annual incomes of less than $2,000 in 1949. About 5 million, or less than one-half, of the 11 million children in these lower-income families lived on farms, where cash incomes were frequently supplemented by food and other necessities produced and consumed on the family farm. The remaining 6 million children in these families lived in nonfarm areas where the income of less than $40 a week more closely approximated all that was available for family living.

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1 This report presents the family characteristics af the 42.3 million children in the United States whose parents were family heads in March 1950. Excluded are 5.5 million children most of whom were in families in which they were not the family head's own children, or lived in institutions.

Component ID: #ti702095047

A Note on Language

Census statistics date back to 1790 and reflect the growth and change of the United States. Past census reports contain some terms that today’s readers may consider obsolete and inappropriate. As part of our goal to be open and transparent with the public, we are improving access to all Census Bureau original publications and statistics, which serve as a guide to the nation's history.

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